Monthly Archives: June 2011

Flashpoint – Estoril: “If he wants the Championship THAT much….”

Estoril, 1988
Prost’s pole position is undermined as Senna matches him to the first corner, but he gently eases Senna towards the edge of the track.  Senna has none of it and chops in front of Prost, leaving his team-mate to avoid the accident by stamping hard on the brakes.

Nevertheless, at the end of the first lap Prost is right on Senna’s tail and pulls alongside at around 300 kph.  The pitwall is flashing past, decorated with the pit signal boards held out by the teams.  Senna counters Prost’s attempt to pass on the right by also moving to the right, edging Prost towards the pit wall.  A hasty removal of the pit signal boards by the team managers prevents them being clipped by Prost’s wheels as they all but scrape the wall. Both McLarens’ wheels are in locking position as they hurtle towards the end of the pit straight, towards a horrific accident.  Prost can do little but edge out a little towards Senna to force him out a little.  At the last minute Prost manages to take the corner cleanly and goes on to win the race.

‘If he wants the Championship that much, he can have it…’ was Prost’s post-race reaction.  Senna apologized, but the rivalry had gone up another notch.

Senna Versus Prost: The Story of the Most Deadly Rivalry in Formula One
by: Malcolm Folley
publisher: Random House UK, published: 2010-05-26
ASIN: 0099528096
EAN: 9780099528098
sales rank: 58998
price: $9.83 (new), $9.29 (used)

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Formula One was at its most explosive, with thrilling races, charismatic drivers, nail-biting climaxes—and one of the most dangerous rivalries ever witnessed in sports. Two of F1’s most honored champions and iconic figures drove together for McLaren for two seasons, and their acrimonious and hostile relationship extended even after one of them had left the team. Alain Prost was France’s only F1 world champion, an intelligent, smooth driver with the epithet “Le Professeur,” while Ayrton Senna was the mercurial kid from a privileged background in Sao Paolo who would become the most intense and ruthless racing driver the world has ever seen. As the great rivals raced to victory, their relationship deteriorated badly, culminating in Prost accusing Senna of deliberately trying to ride him off the circuit, and fearful that the Brazilian would get someone killed with his daring overtaking feats. The final, sad act of this drama happened at the San Marino Grand prix at Imola in May 1994, when Senna was killed. Insights from Martin Brundle, Damon Hill, Sir Frank Williams, Bernie Ecclestone, Derek Warwick, Johnny Herbert, Gerhard Berger, plus McLaren insiders and other F1 figures provide a breathtaking account of one of the all-time classic sporting rivalries.

Setting the Scene – Prost and Senna in 1988

Prost and Senna at McLaren – THE pairing of 1988

 

Alan Fearnley Alain Prost Motor Racing Car Grand Prix
publisher: old-print
ASIN: B0014IT8DC
price: $447.75 (new)

Long established at McLaren, Prost saw himself very much as a ‘team’ driver, and was recognized as the most complete and accomplished of Grand Prix drivers in 1988.  The fierce dedication and self-belief of Ayrton Senna, probably the fastest driver for sheer pace but less of a team player, was in stark contrast.  All the attention at the start of the season was focused on how these two philosophies would mesh.

Prost was comfortable at ‘his’ team, already a double World Champion, and happy to share technical information.  Senna, with a burning ambition, was the new boy.  Harmony was not a priority.

Senna acknowledged Prost’s greater experience at setting up the car, and made use of Prost’s car settings for the races, and initially Alain was happy to help Senna find his feet.

In the middle part of the season Senna got the upper hand, being a faster qualifier and more adept at lapping slower cars.  Senna’s ability to drive a ‘perfect’ lap in qualifying was partly due to his experience with the Honda engine at Lotus the previous year. Jabbing the throttle to keep the engine within its power band paid off in the corners, whereas Prost was more used to the TAG/Porsche engine which had suited his smoother use of the throttle.  After four straight Senna victories Prost’s began to lose faith in his cars, the MP4/4-4 and the MP4/4-2, and it is true that when his new car arrived, the MP4/4-6 he proceeded to win three of the season’s final four races. It is notable that the one he didn’t win, at Japan’s Suzuka circuit, was the one that cost him the Championship, and Senna’s decisiveness in lapping back markers in contrast to Prost’s more cautious approach was the decisive Championship moment.

From Prost’s point of view, there were suspicions of favouritism at McLaren.  Why was an old engine fitted to his car in Germany in qualifying? Why did his engine fail in Italy? Why did his gearbox cause trouble in Japan? Or was it the clutch?  More to the point, why did Senna not have these problems?

Career stats to date: Prost and Senna at the start of the 1988 season

Alain Prost
Start of 1988
GPs: 121
Wins: 28
Podiums: 55
Total Points: 406.5
Average points/race: 3.36
Pole Positions: 16
Fastest Laps: 20
GP debut: 1980
World Championships: 2

Ayrton Senna
Start of 1988
GPs: 62
Wins: 6
Podiums: 25
Total Points: 163
Average points/race: 2.63
Pole Positions: 16
Fastest Laps: 7
GP debut: 1984
World Championships: 0

Senna Versus Prost: The Story of the Most Deadly Rivalry in Formula One
by: Malcolm Folley
publisher: Random House UK, published: 2010-05-26
ASIN: 0099528096
EAN: 9780099528098
sales rank: 67783
price: $9.81 (new), $9.23 (used)

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Formula One was at its most explosive, with thrilling races, charismatic drivers, nail-biting climaxes—and one of the most dangerous rivalries ever witnessed in sports. Two of F1’s most honored champions and iconic figures drove together for McLaren for two seasons, and their acrimonious and hostile relationship extended even after one of them had left the team. Alain Prost was France’s only F1 world champion, an intelligent, smooth driver with the epithet “Le Professeur,” while Ayrton Senna was the mercurial kid from a privileged background in Sao Paolo who would become the most intense and ruthless racing driver the world has ever seen. As the great rivals raced to victory, their relationship deteriorated badly, culminating in Prost accusing Senna of deliberately trying to ride him off the circuit, and fearful that the Brazilian would get someone killed with his daring overtaking feats. The final, sad act of this drama happened at the San Marino Grand prix at Imola in May 1994, when Senna was killed. Insights from Martin Brundle, Damon Hill, Sir Frank Williams, Bernie Ecclestone, Derek Warwick, Johnny Herbert, Gerhard Berger, plus McLaren insiders and other F1 figures provide a breathtaking account of one of the all-time classic sporting rivalries.

Senna & Prost As Team Mates – 1988 Season Overview

In the middle part of the season Senna got the upper hand, being a faster qualifier and more adept at lapping slower cars. Senna’s ability to drive a ‘perfect’ lap in qualifying was partly due to his experience with the Honda engine at Lotus the previous year. Jabbing the throttle to keep the engine within its power band paid off in the corners, whereas Prost was more used to the TAG/Porsche engine which had suited his smoother use of the throttle.

After four straight Senna victories Prost’s began to lose faith in his cars, the MP4/4-4 and the MP4/4-2, and it is true that when his new car arrived, the MP4/4-6 he proceeded to win three of the season’s final four races. It is notable that the one he didn’t win, at Japan’s Suzuka circuit, was the one that cost him the Championship, and Senna’s decisiveness in lapping back markers in contrast to Prost’s more cautious approach was the decisive Championship moment.

From Prost’s point of view, there were suspicions of favouritism at McLaren. Why was an old engine fitted to his car in Germany for qualifying? Why did his engine fail in Italy? Why did his gearbox cause trouble in Japan? Or was it the clutch? More to the point, why did Senna not have these problems?

senna (2 Dvd) Italian Import
publisher: upi
ASIN: B004HNTER6
EAN: 5050582808377
sales rank: 11635
price: $26.91 (new)

un documentario sul campione di formula uno brasiliano ayrton senna che vinse il campionato mondiale per ben tre volte prima della sua scomparsa all’eta’ di 34 anni.

Formula 1 1988 – Prost & Senna, Race-By Race

Flashing Past at 200mph
Flashing Past at 200mph

Brazil
Rio, April 3
Prost wins at Senna’s home race, as the local hero is disqualified after stalling on the grid and using the spare car from the pit lane.
Prost – 9
Senna – 0

San Marino
Imola, May 1
A McLaren whitewash, Senna crossing the line ahead of Prost – and both one lap ahead of the rest.
Prost – 15
Senna – 9

Monaco
MonacoMonte Carlo, May 15
Senna shows his vulnerability, personally and professionally, crashing into a barrier while leading on lap 67 to allow his team mate through to victory.  Senna, meanwhile, is so upset he heads straight back to his apartment and closes the door on the world.
Prost – 24
Senna – 9

Mexico
Mexico City, May 29
Another McLaren one-two, in alphabetical order.
Prost – 33
Senna – 15

Canada
Montreal, June 12
Senna passes Prost early in the race and leads to the finish.
Prost – 39
Senna – 24

USA – East
Detroit, June 19
Senna wins from pole, second-placed Prost the only driver of eight finishers on the same lap.
Prost – 45
Senna – 33

France
Paul Ricard, July 3
Prost takes the honours once again in another dominant McLaren one-two.
Prost – 54
Senna – 39

Britain
Silverstone, July 10
Senna wins in the wet, yet again. This eighth McLaren win on the trot beats a long-standing Ferrari record. Prost’s retirement is his first DNF of the season.
Prost – 54
Senna – 48

Germany
Hockenheim, July 24
Another wet race – won by Senna, the inglorious summer weather playing into his hands yet again. Prost comes in second.
Prost – 60
Senna – 57

Hungary
Hungaroring, August 7
Although Senna wins, Prost takes a moral victory by finishing less than a second behind despite pitting late in the race due to a lost front-wheel bearing. The pair are now level on points.
Prost – 66
Senna – 66

Belgium
Spa-Francorchamps, August 28
A McLaren monopoly with yet another one-two, Senna taking the honours once again.
Prost – 72
Senna – 75

Italy
Monza, September 11
A rare one-two victory for Ferrari in a season of McLaren domination, although Senna leaving the track in an incident with Schlesser may have helped. Prost also retires, with engine trouble.
Prost – 72
Senna – 75

Portugal
Estoril, September 25
One of the first big friction points between Prost and Senna, the former accusing his rival of trying to edge him into the pit wall at nearly 250kph. Senna claims not to have seen Prost’s car. Prost takes victory and the second McLaren is way behind in sixth.
Prost – 81
Senna – 76

Spain
Jerez, October 2
Prost takes victory, pole-sitter Senna comes in a distant 4th.
Prost – 90
Senna – 79

Japan
Suzuka, October 30
Senna wins the race and his first Championship – with one race to spare. Even a non-finish in the final race would leave Senna’s ‘Best 11’ points for the season at 87, with 8 victories. Prost could equal 87 points at Adelaide, but only with a maximum 7 victories.
Prost – 96
Senna – 88

Australia
Adelaide, November 13
Ending the season as they began it, another McLaren one-two, Championship runner-up Prost claiming consolation prize with victory by over 30 seconds in the final race.
Prost – 105 (87)*
Senna – 94 (90)*

*A driver’s ‘Best 11’ finishes counted towards the Championship.

McLaren & Senna 1988

Ayrton Senna-An Official Tribute
ASIN: B00022EF0M
EAN: 0724359959894
sales rank: 38768
price: $39.99 (new)

DISC 1: The Right to Win (52 min); The lifestyle of Ayrton Senna in Brazil (44 min.) DISC 2: Racing is in my blood (52 min.) Plus Libreto: “Images of Perfection”

The record books are rewritten

McLaren’s record-breaking fifteen victories out of sixteen races was all the more remarkable, given their new relationship with Honda as engine supplier. McLaren’s previous run of twenty-five wins in four years with TAG/Porsche was itself a record.
Of those fifteen wins, Ayrton Senna – the new boy in the team – won eight of them, becoming World Champion in the process. Ten races were won in 1-2 formation and thirteen of the fifteen pole postions were claimed by Senna.  In those days when a driver’s eleven best results counted towards the Championship, Prost’s 105 points to Senna’s 94 were still not enough, Senna eventually winning by 90 to 87 – a close run thing. McLaren’s Construction Championship victory by 199 to Ferrari’s 65 was the opposite. A record-breaking season all round.

So, in a season of record-breaking domination, Prost finished fourteen of sixteen races, won seven of them, finished second in the other seven – yet did not become World Champion!

What of the competition?  Major rule changes were afoot for 1989, a new ‘non-turbo’ era, and many of the teams opted to shift their main development focus further ahead.  Would that do them any good?  Prost and Senna’s main rivals were still to be each other…

Senna & Prost – Flashpoint: Suzuka 1989

The Japanese Grand Prix – Suzuka 1989

Fireworks at Suzuka
Fireworks between Senna & Prost at Suzuka

“He was in the middle of the circuit, so I came on the inside. We were almost side by side, I was half a wheel behind him, when he turned in.” Ayrton Senna’s version of events which led to his exclusion from the race he had won, crucial to his World Championship hopes.

Resisting An Overtaking Manoeuvre

“No question, Ayrton is a fantastic driver”, said Prost, “but the problem is that he can’t accept not to win, and he can’t accept that somebody may resist an overtaking manoeuvre.”
Two seasons of on-off enmity boiled over as the two leading McLarens collided, Senna ‘in the process of’ overtaking Prost.  Despite a lost minute of disengaging and further lost time replacing the nose cone, Senna resumed the race to seal his victory in a race he had to win to keep his Championship hopes alive.  Subsequently excluded from the race for being pushed back on the track and cutting the chicane, rather than the incident itself, Senna was also punished with the suspension of his superlicence for 12 months (itself suspended for 6 months) and a $100,000 fine. The stewards blamed Senna for the incident, and accused him of being a driver who ‘deliberately endangers the lives of others’, while Senna himself claimed that Prost had pushed him off the circuit in order to win the title.  Ron Dennis, for his part, later produced a helicopter video which apparently showed Prost turning into the chicane “about 10 yards too soon”, pushing Senna over the kerb.

A Racing Incident?

Senna later revealed in an interview with Kunihiko Akai that an electrical problem had reduced the power of his engine, increasing the difficulty of overtaking. “Prost had beaten me at the start because I got too much wheelspin…almost immediately I knew that my car was short of acceleration, especially out of the chicane going on to the straight.  (To pass) the only place was the chicane because it’s the only place on the track where I could make use of my late braking, by coming on the inside, but I had to be close to him.  That was difficult because the corner before the chicane is such a fast one.  I got close behind him on the straight and stayed there all the way through the quick corner.  It was very dangerous for me because when driving in the slipstream the wheels lose downforce.  We were almost side by side, I was only half a wheel behind him when he turned in.  Just before we touched I could see him here beside me, doing that (moving the wheel).  When I saw him doing that, I moved more, but there was no room.  I even jumped over the kerb to avoid him but we engaged wheels.  I can understand what he did, of course, because he could only gain, he had nothing to lose.  So what he did was just turn the steering wheel and let the cars engage, to make sure that we both stopped.  But what took place afterwards was unfair because it was clear that the disqualification from the race was already established by the stewards before I even arrived in their room.  They said to me, first of all – ‘Why did you cause an accident?’  I said I didn’t cause an accident, we were fighting close, that’s motor racing, and that happens.  When the marshals pushed me back on the track they were only doing something that is done dozens of times by other drivers, without penalty.”

Under-Power or Under-Hand?

An earlier flashpoint in the season came at Monza. After the race, Prost claimed that Honda had been supplying him with an under-powered engine, and then-President of FISA Jean-Marie Balestre supported him in this view – though what evidence there was isn’t clear.  What is clear is that Honda subsequently produced engine data suggesting that Prost was simply not driving as hard as Senna.  The Brazilian’s dangerous rift with Balestre stemmed from this apparent siding with ‘the opposition’, and Senna had later to retract remarks made about the President at the end of the season.  A well-orchestrated clearing of the air between Balestre and Senna by McLaren and their sponsors led to an eleventh hour reprieve for Senna’s 1990 season superlicence, despite Senna’s claim that he was prepared to fight on – or retire…

Formula 1 Heroes 1989 – Senna & Prost: Setting the Scene

For much of his F1 career Ayrton Senna was quite obviously the fastest driver in the world, but it was not until his arrival at McLaren, and his first World Championship, that he could really be on equal terms with double World Champion Prost.  Despite his brilliance in the wet, in traffic and his qualifying speed there remained a question mark as to his temperament – and Prost remained the greatest in overall terms.

No-one in history was even close to Prost’s 35 victories from 137 grand prix, and the strike rate of nearly one race in four was unprecedented among his contemporaries of the modern era. Despite Senna’s awesome talent and total dedication Prost several times beat Senna for pace – in the dry.  Prost admitted to a reluctance to take the chances he may have committed to in his youth, but his maturity, intelligence and minimal mistakes more than compensated.  More relaxed with his career progression than Senna, he remained the most complete driver in Formula One.

Mansell on Prost in 1989: “I have no doubt whatsoever in nominating Alain Prost as the overall great Formula One driver of today…Alain has been in a position of strength with the team he’s been in (McLaren)…and he has set phenomenal standards.”

Turbo-charged engines were banned for 1989, and many of the drivers had to adapt to a new driving technique. Although Alain Prost had driven in Formula One with a normally-aspirated engine – as long ago as 1980 – Ayrton Senna had never raced with a non-turbo Formula One car. Patrick Head of Williams pointed out that cars with normally-aspirated engines were much more driveable, and drivers were able to use the engines so much better in the corners. As a result both Prost and Senna would be faster than the previous year, despite the rule change.

Senna Versus Prost: The Story of the Most Deadly Rivalry in Formula One
by: Malcolm Folley
publisher: Random House UK, published: 2010-05-26
ASIN: 0099528096
EAN: 9780099528098
sales rank: 67783
price: $9.81 (new), $9.23 (used)

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Formula One was at its most explosive, with thrilling races, charismatic drivers, nail-biting climaxes—and one of the most dangerous rivalries ever witnessed in sports. Two of F1’s most honored champions and iconic figures drove together for McLaren for two seasons, and their acrimonious and hostile relationship extended even after one of them had left the team. Alain Prost was France’s only F1 world champion, an intelligent, smooth driver with the epithet “Le Professeur,” while Ayrton Senna was the mercurial kid from a privileged background in Sao Paolo who would become the most intense and ruthless racing driver the world has ever seen. As the great rivals raced to victory, their relationship deteriorated badly, culminating in Prost accusing Senna of deliberately trying to ride him off the circuit, and fearful that the Brazilian would get someone killed with his daring overtaking feats. The final, sad act of this drama happened at the San Marino Grand prix at Imola in May 1994, when Senna was killed. Insights from Martin Brundle, Damon Hill, Sir Frank Williams, Bernie Ecclestone, Derek Warwick, Johnny Herbert, Gerhard Berger, plus McLaren insiders and other F1 figures provide a breathtaking account of one of the all-time classic sporting rivalries.

Formula 1 Heroes 1989 – Senna & Prost, Race-by-Race

The 1989 Formula 1 Season starts here!

The 1989 Formula 1 Season starts here!

Brazil
Rio, March 26
Senna and Ferrari’s Berger are eliminated at the first corner of the first race. Prost’s McLaren limps on with a faulty clutch. Nigel Mansell wins in his first race for Ferrari.
Prost – 6 points
Senna – 0 points

San Marino
Imola, April 23
The spark was ready to ignite for the rest of the season when Senna ‘steals’ the lead from Prost at the first corner of a re-started race and goes on to win. The McLaren pair’s pre-race agreement to avoid a potential accident by holding back from whichever is leading at the first corner comes to nothing – and it does nothing for their relationship.
Prost – 12 points
Senna – 9 points

Monaco
MonacoMonte Carlo, May 7
Senna again gains the upper hand over Prost despite losing two gears. A race Prost should have won.
Prost – 18 points
Senna – 18 points

Mexico
Mexico City, May 28
Senna makes the correct choice of tyres, while Prost makes two pit stops to forget. Senna maintains his momentum.
Prost – 20 points
Senna – 27 points

USA
Phoenix, June 4
Prost finishes way clear of the rest, while Senna’s engine management system lets him down and he is forced to retire.
Prost – 29 points
Senna – 27 points

Canada
Montreal, June 18
Senna is set to take full advantage of Prost’s second lap retirement with a broken suspension, until his engine blows up with three laps to run.  As you were.
Prost – 29 points
Senna – 27 points

France
Paul Ricard, July 9
A second consecutive DNF for Senna, this time with transmission failure.  Prost wins with spectacular ease.
Prost – 38 points
Senna – 27 points

Britain
Silverstone, July 16
Senna’s troubles mount, spinning off with another transmission glitch, Prost in his mirrors.  The worst scenario for Senna, as a delighted Prost takes over the lead for his third victory of the season, now way ahead on points.
Prost – 47 points
Senna – 27 points

Germany
Hockenheim, July 30
A topsy-turvy race, as a botched pit stop for Senna gives Prost the chance to take the lead – until that McLaren gearbox spoils his race three laps from the end, and Senna reaps the reward.  Prost still finishes as runner-up. Mechanical failure is even-handed in the end.
Prost – 53 points
Senna – 36 points

Hungary
Hungaroring, August 13
A McLaren is out-raced for a change, Nigel Mansell scoring a famous victory over Senna as the Brazilian driver hesitates over a backmarker and Mansell zips through. Prost meanwhile finishes a distant 4th.
Prost – 56 points
Senna – 42 points

Belgium
Spa-Francorchamps, August 27
Senna proves his skill in the rain once again, apparently oblivious to the spray as he wins the race well ahead of a battling Prost who just manages to keep a determined Mansell at bay.
Prost – 62 points
Senna – 51 points

Italy
Monza, September 10
Senna’s victory seems assured until the engine lets go eight laps from the flag, handing the race to Prost – who then complains that his qualification time nearly two seconds behind Senna was due to his Honda engine lacking the power of Senna’s car.
Prost – 71 points
Senna – 51 points

Portugal
Estoril, September 24
Disaster for Senna as Mansell takes him out while Prost pursues eventual winner Berger. The Championship is starting to look a lost cause for Senna, who now needs maximum points from the last three races.
Prost – 77 points
Senna – 51 points

Spain
Jerez, October 1
Senna wins to keep his hopes alive, while Prost is pushed back to third by Berger.
Prost – 81 points
Senna – 60 points

Japan
Suzuka, October 22
The moment of truth! Will Senna win again to keep the Championship in sight?  Yes, but, no but…what an anticlimax!  Senna wins pole by a distance, and wins the race after a ‘brave’ passing move on Prost which nearly puts them both out of the race. That would be the  best result for Prost but not for Senna, who limps to the pits for a new nose cone, eventually finishes first, only to be excluded for a technicality – disputed long into the winter…
Prost – 81 points
Senna – 60 points

Australia
Adelaide, November 5
A lost cause for Senna, who crashes into the back of Brundle while leading in torrential rain. His consolation prize of an end-of-season victory is handed to Boutsen.
Prost – 76 points (81 points in total)*
Senna – 60 points*

*A driver’s ‘Best 11’ finishes counted towards the Championship.

Senna Movie Poster (11 x 17 Inches – 28cm x 44cm) (2010) Japanese Style A -(Ayrton Senna)(Alain Prost)(Frank Williams)(Ron Dennis)(Viviane Senna)
publisher: MG Poster
ASIN: B004UNIBRW
sales rank: 898758
price: $9.73 (new)

Senna Poster (11 x 17 Inches – 28cm x 44cm) (2010) Japanese Style A reproduction poster print

CAST: Ayrton Senna, Alain Prost

Coming Round Again: Prost & Senna – Button & Hamilton?

McLaren Lewis Hamilton Formula One F1 Sports Poster Print – 24×36 Sports Poster Print, 24×36
publisher: Poster Discount
ASIN: B003F13A5I
sales rank: 312943
price: $8.21 (new)

Decorate your home or office with high quality posters. McLaren Lewis Hamilton Formula One F1 Sports Poster Print – 24×36 is that perfect piece that matches your style, interests, and budget.

 

Are Button & Hamilton the new Prost & Senna?
The pairing of Lewis Hamilton with Jenson Button at McLaren for the 2010 and 2011 seasons brings to mind the 1988 and 1989 seasons. When former World Champion Alain Prost was joined by World Champion-in-waiting Ayrton Senna the driver team seemed to be a dream ticket.  What happened in those two seasons?  Will there be any similarities in the present McLaren team…?

Jenson Button has sometimes been compared in his smooth driving style with ‘The Professor’ Alain Prost.  Lewis Hamilton shows traits of Senna, in his all-out driving style, self-belief, and ruthless will-to-win.  Neither of these two contemporaries are uniquely similar to their historic counterparts, but they are the only two on the current grid placed in this uniquely similar position. Click here to watch them do battle in 2011.

Here are the statistics of all four drivers at this stage of their careers, when they were first paired at the McLaren team.

(Career stats to date Button/Hamilton and contemporary Prost/Senna)

Alain Prost
Start of 1988
GPs: 121
Wins: 28
Podiums: 55
Total Points: 406.5
Average points/race: 3.36
Pole Positions: 16
Fastest Laps: 20
GP debut: 1980
World Championships: 2

Ayrton Senna
Start of 1988
GPs: 62
Wins: 6
Podiums: 25
Total Points: 163
Average points/race: 2.63
Pole Positions: 16
Fastest Laps: 7
GP debut: 1984
World Championships: 0

Jenson Button
Start of 2010
GPs: 170
Wins: 7
Podiums: 17
Total Points: 327
Average points/race: 1.92
Pole Positions: 7
Fastest Laps: 2
GP debut: 2000
World Championships: 1

Lewis Hamilton
Start of 2010
GPs: 52
Wins: 11
Podiums: 16
Total Points: 256
Average points/race: 4.92
Pole Positions: 17
Fastest Laps: 3
GP debut: 2007
World Championships: 1